3 Reasons for Change This Summer

Summer is a time for active leisure.

People everywhere spend more time out and socializing with family and friends. So it is a great time to implement a refreshed approach to company organization and consumer-experience.

Not only will people be booking vacations and travelling a lot, but they will be willing to invest more energy and time into their activities. Summer months have proven to be filled with positive attitudes and daring decisions!

Even farmers feel the need to change. Not content with growing just potatoes Danny Johns is still growing potatoes at Blue Sky Farms, but has added new crops to his ever growing portfolio to best serve customers at Costco, one of the main retail stores he supplies his vegetables to.

Your role:

Some companies may take the opportunity to expand, while others might need to make cuts and do some re-organizing. Regardless, summer is a time to cater your product towards people’s emotions – in a fun, active way. Maybe a change in vision is in order? Here are 3 ways to help your company get ready to make changes this summer!

Gartner Analysts want to make sure that we: “Foster organizational change by making sure everyone understands “What’s in It for Me,” and recognize and reward successful early adopters.”

1. Acknowledge the process and be intentional about it. Seasons change outside of our control, but within your company you dictate every step of the way. And there are steps; understand that no change can happen overnight, so intrigue your clients and encourage them to stay tuned.

Creating random reward schedules for your product-users will inspire them to keep checking-in at regular intervals. You might also try the scarcity effect approach, and advertise deals for a limited time only. Summer seems like an active season, but it also includes a lot of quiet relaxation and heat-induced laziness. Help your clients feel active by engaging with your company on their down time, and keep them wanting more with flash deals that last anywhere between 8 and 24 hours.

2. Assess your management capability. Set clear goals within your reach and keep employee and client behaviors in mind. Being open will gain you support throughout. Stay sensitive to people’s feelings without losing sight of your goal, even when making changes means structural reorganization within departments. Monitor responses, and be available for support during the transition.

Many view the sunshine months as a period of heightened happiness. Dr. Linda Hancock invites her readers on Ezine Articles to list 50 things they love about summer. Consider her advice as a tool to set a new perspective for the vision and relationships set by your company.

3. Use your familiar mode of communication to share any changes with your customers and employees. Explore potential consequences and get approval from the leaders within your company. Employees are partially your clients, who might be brimming with great ideas that will make your business stronger – and that will personally affect them, so who better to ask? Communicate your ideas early and allow a chance to ask questions and speak up. Summer is a time for organized sports in the sun, so do some team-building and become a positive-minded role model.

Gartner has learned that: “Gartner clients consistently state that if they could do one thing differently regarding their ERP deployment, they would spend more money and effort on organizational change management (OCM) and training.”

Summer is all about a more casual lifestyle and taking care of your needs. It is a time to feel, and to act on temptations. Summer is short – so include changes that make you feel good on a personal level. Enjoy the good life – not just in leisure, but through the work dedicated to your company and clients, too.

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Christopher Smith
Chris is the Lead Author & Editor of Change Blog. Chris established the Change blog to create a source for news and discussion about some of the issues, challenges, news, and ideas relating to Change Management.
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